Blog

The green roof as an air enhancer

Expertise
News
>
The green roof as an air enhancer
Written by

We all know some of the benefits of green roofs: they help buffer rainwater, improve aesthetics, thermal and acoustic insulation of the roof, create additional useful space and contribute to increased biodiversity. Several independent studies now also show that green roofs improve air quality and thus also play a role in slowing climate change.

That a green roof helps improve air quality should really come as no surprise. Plants on the roof - or equally well against the facades - act as filters, just as trees do. They capture and retain common pollutants. Think of particulate matter, CO2, ozone and nitrogen oxides (NOx). This effect can be felt and measured in the immediate vicinity of a green roof. University research in some major cities also demonstrates this. For example, in 2007, researchers in Chicago installed green roofs on some 300 buildings, totaling 27.87 acres. After the first year, the roofs together removed 1,675 kg of air pollutants from their surroundings. In the following years, that share increased steadily thanks to the continued development of the plants. The lessons from this study suggest that a green roof of 1,000m² can capture about 6kg of air pollutants on an annual basis.

Furthermore, the researchers learned that sedum, a commonly used plant on green roofs, annually stores about 1.23 kg ofCO2 per square meter. So an 813m² sedum roof manages to capture 1 ton of CO2 annually. This offsets about 10,000 km of driving a gasoline car. And in return, the roof provides oxygen.

Catching heavy metals

Researchers in Toronto, Canada, looked a little more broadly in their study and looked at the different combinations of trees, shrubs, green facades and green roofs in the city. Their research also confirms that green roofs have a positive effect on pollutant capture. A 1,000m² grass roof can remove about 2 tons of particulate matter annually. Compared to particulate matter emissions from cars, one square meter of green roof is enough to remove the emissions of one car.

Furthermore, it appears that green roofs and green facades also manage to absorb heavy metals. Leaves absorb up to 95% of cadmium, copper and lead and 16% zinc from their immediate environment. An extensive green roof of 20m² will remove about as many pollutant metals from the air as a medium-sized tree.

Convinced of the benefits of a green roof? Ask here to request your quote.

Quote icon in green
No items found.
News
>
The green roof as an air enhancer

We all know some of the benefits of green roofs: they help buffer rainwater, improve aesthetics, thermal and acoustic insulation of the roof, create additional useful space and contribute to increased biodiversity. Several independent studies now also show that green roofs improve air quality and thus also play a role in slowing climate change.

That a green roof helps improve air quality should really come as no surprise. Plants on the roof - or equally well against the facades - act as filters, just as trees do. They capture and retain common pollutants. Think of particulate matter, CO2, ozone and nitrogen oxides (NOx). This effect can be felt and measured in the immediate vicinity of a green roof. University research in some major cities also demonstrates this. For example, in 2007, researchers in Chicago installed green roofs on some 300 buildings, totaling 27.87 acres. After the first year, the roofs together removed 1,675 kg of air pollutants from their surroundings. In the following years, that share increased steadily thanks to the continued development of the plants. The lessons from this study suggest that a green roof of 1,000m² can capture about 6kg of air pollutants on an annual basis.

Furthermore, the researchers learned that sedum, a commonly used plant on green roofs, annually stores about 1.23 kg ofCO2 per square meter. So an 813m² sedum roof manages to capture 1 ton of CO2 annually. This offsets about 10,000 km of driving a gasoline car. And in return, the roof provides oxygen.

Catching heavy metals

Researchers in Toronto, Canada, looked a little more broadly in their study and looked at the different combinations of trees, shrubs, green facades and green roofs in the city. Their research also confirms that green roofs have a positive effect on pollutant capture. A 1,000m² grass roof can remove about 2 tons of particulate matter annually. Compared to particulate matter emissions from cars, one square meter of green roof is enough to remove the emissions of one car.

Furthermore, it appears that green roofs and green facades also manage to absorb heavy metals. Leaves absorb up to 95% of cadmium, copper and lead and 16% zinc from their immediate environment. An extensive green roof of 20m² will remove about as many pollutant metals from the air as a medium-sized tree.

Convinced of the benefits of a green roof? Ask here to request your quote.

News
>
The green roof as an air enhancer

We all know some of the benefits of green roofs: they help buffer rainwater, improve aesthetics, thermal and acoustic insulation of the roof, create additional useful space and contribute to increased biodiversity. Several independent studies now also show that green roofs improve air quality and thus also play a role in slowing climate change.

That a green roof helps improve air quality should really come as no surprise. Plants on the roof - or equally well against the facades - act as filters, just as trees do. They capture and retain common pollutants. Think of particulate matter, CO2, ozone and nitrogen oxides (NOx). This effect can be felt and measured in the immediate vicinity of a green roof. University research in some major cities also demonstrates this. For example, in 2007, researchers in Chicago installed green roofs on some 300 buildings, totaling 27.87 acres. After the first year, the roofs together removed 1,675 kg of air pollutants from their surroundings. In the following years, that share increased steadily thanks to the continued development of the plants. The lessons from this study suggest that a green roof of 1,000m² can capture about 6kg of air pollutants on an annual basis.

Furthermore, the researchers learned that sedum, a commonly used plant on green roofs, annually stores about 1.23 kg ofCO2 per square meter. So an 813m² sedum roof manages to capture 1 ton of CO2 annually. This offsets about 10,000 km of driving a gasoline car. And in return, the roof provides oxygen.

Quote icon in green
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group news and insights

Arrow icon to the right in blue
Events
June 5, 2024

Tectum Vélo 2024

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

The green roof as an air enhancer

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

The role of AOC's in the transition to sustainability

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Roof and wall renovation: A healthy home in a healthy building envelope

Read more

Expertise
June 5, 2024

Renolution premiums run up to 90% of renovation cost

Excessive or necessary?

Read more

Stories
April 30, 2024

A behind-the-scenes look at roofing training

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

BossCover EPDM confirmed quality

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group nominated for Innovation Award 2023

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Climate roof lifts flat roof to versatile height

Read more

Stories
April 30, 2024

30 years of service for Wasiel Szlapak

Read more

Stories
April 30, 2024

New working environment for the colleagues of SIX by Tectum

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Working at height: collective vs personal protection

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

CPE Netherlands strengthens market position with acquisition of Altena Dakspecialiteiten

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Periodic maintenance ensures longer life of flat roof

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group Recycle EPDM cuttings and turn them into roof tiles

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Will permanent railings become the new standard in fall protection?

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Eco-friendly water coolers for Tectum Group

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Know-how as a trademark for artisanal roofing work

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group acquires roofing company DSB

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Custom aluminum balustrades that imitade the steel look

Read more

Stories
April 30, 2024

Tectummer Bert Herssens

Read more

Stories
April 30, 2024

Tectummer Kingsley Madu

Read more

Events
April 30, 2024

Great interest in debate on circular flat roofs

Nearly 40% of global CO2 emissions are emitted by the construction industry. Time to change course. With a debate on circularity and circular flat roofs, Tectum Group is doing its part. Review the full debate.

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

Mechanical fastening is the future of ventilated cladding

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group trains their own roofers

SERV report confirms what we already knew

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group realizes world's first circular flat roof

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

PIR insulation is not suitable for intensive green roofs

Read more

Expertise
April 30, 2024

How to thoughtfully manage water harvesting on a blue roof?

Read more

News
April 30, 2024

Tectum Group welcomes SIX Roof & Facade

Read more